Honeycomb

Fused glass honeycomb mandala

I’m working on my second honeycomb piece. The first one looked amazing, and then I tried fusing the top details onto the base and it melted into a puddle of color. This is a photo of my second try before fusing. I would like those top details to nicely melt, just a little bit, into the base. The problem is that when you heat all that glass together, it must heat and cool at the same rate. If those thinner top pieces cool slower than the thick bottom, they will crack, or the whole piece will crack. It gets complicated. Stay tuned to see if I can figure out a very slow fusing schedule that will heat and cool everything to perfection.

Time for a Change

Warm weather is coming, spring is in the air, and its time for a change. This will be the last post on this particular blogsite, although I will leave it here as an archive.

When I started this blog, I enjoyed playing with the free tools at WordPress.com, and created my blog and website here. Fast forward to 2015, and my life is moving forward and expanding in many directions. Instead of being confined to the free templates of WordPress, I have immersed myself in learning how to work with custom templates, manipulating them and creating custom websites with my business partner in graphic design.

The inspiration found in writing an art blog and scouring the internet for ideas has turned into a focus into my own business of creation. I am thinking about continuing a variation of this art blog on my Rowanberry Studio home site, but will not do the research I have done here, which I love, but is very time consuming.

Thanks to those of you who have followed and those who have kindly commented. Namaste.

Find me here:

Chelini & Oeffling, Inc.

C&O animated gifRowanberry Studio

Linda Oeffling animated gifOutside Indigo

Outside Indigo animated gif

Tumblr:

Land of Oh

go ahead and wire that baby

Kind of a convoluted blog story, but I belatedly saw this article (from 2011) and cracked up.

Damien Hirst“The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living” by Damien Hirst
(Image credit: Fickr user Rupert Ganzer)

Kind of ironic that in “the physical impossibility of death”, the dead tiger shark suspended in an acrylic tank filled with 224 gallons of water immediately began to rot. Hirst’s artwork was on display at London’s Saatchi Gallery.  It started to smell, and efforts began to stem the odor.  They added bleach, which only made the shark decompose faster.  Read the whole, fascinating story here: Neatorama.

I shouldn’t laugh – karma will always come back to you in the end. As much as you think you plan your artwork, you never know what you may forget to consider.

My fellow glass studio workers consistently tease me for the “Oeffling Standard of Work:  Make it Last for 100 Years.”  I insist on structuring pieces as best I can, to be as sturdy as they can be, so that they can withstand handling and often, outdoor elements, for as many years as possible.  (No, I don’t believe I would guarantee one hundred years…)

Linda Oeffling: stained glass snowflakeSo every dimensional stained glass piece I create has copper wire painstakingly soldered around each outside edge. This can add up to an hour or more of work for a small piece, not to mention copious amounts of solder, which keeps increasing in price. The copper wire reinforces the piece, holding it together as gravity tries year after year to make it sag apart.

So “ha” to my lovely co-creators in glass!  Learn the lesson from Damien and wire that baby!

new website

I have upgraded my Rowanberry Studio website, using a lovely template from WordPress.: http://www.rowanberrystudio.com.  I have Fall/Winter shows coming up, so this is a great time to have a new showcase.

art of the land 2012

Art of the Land is one of my favorite shows.  I participated last year and can’t wait to go back to the Starline Gallery this September.  I hope any of you blog readers who are local can come out to see the show.  Entries must be nature-inspired, showcasing the beauty of McHenry County.  The people involved are warm and welcoming.  The Starline is amazing. See more about the Starline, an old factory turned  studio space. See more about the great work being done by the Land Conservancy of McHenry County.

finally something new

I know, I seem to have dropped off the planet.  My computer work has gotten quite busy, and the gardening season has been here for a while now.  Instead of my cozy winter mornings searching out new art online, I have been making over my perennial beds, digging grass with long white roots, and persistently fighting bindweed vines. Beautiful gardens are indeed a form of art.

My own art is coming along, with a nice boost from my blacksmith friend Will Slagel.  He stopped over yesterday to bring more iron stands for the mandalas.

Japanese Crane by Linda OefflingJapanese Crane by Linda Oeffling, Iron Stand by Will Slagel

Sun Kaleidescope Mandala by Linda OefflingSun Kaleidoscope Mandala by Linda Oeffling, Iron Stand by Will Slagel

Nest Mandala by Linda OefflingNest Mandala by Linda Oeffling, Iron stand by Will Slagel

Lily of the Valley Mandala by Linda OefflingLily of the Valley by Linda Oeffling

Lily of the Valley is my current favorite, despite the fact that I have to use a purchased stand, and not a custom design by Will.  I made this piece with several layers, and so it is too thick to fit in the  other stands.

Now my current focus must be getting these out into the world, specifically by finding galleries that would be a perfect fit for my work.

 

feathers of my own

Yesterday I featured Kate MccGwire’s feather sculptures, so it seems appropriate to feature some of my own feathery works.

Crane Dance by Linda OefflingCrane Dance, Linda Oeffling
Custom wrought iron stand by Will Slagel of Metal Meanders

Sandhill cranes were a rare sight around this area several years ago.  There must be new habitat or different migration or something, because now we regularly see and hear them. According to the International Crane Foundation, they are in fact the most numerous of the world’s cranes.

While calling, cranes stand in an upright posture, usually with their heads thrown back and beaks skyward during the display. . . . All cranes engage in dancing, which includes various behaviors such as bowing, jumping, running, stick or grass tossing, as well as wing flapping. Though it is commonly associated with courtship, dancing can occur at any age and season. – from the International Crane Foundation website

Japanese Crane by Linda OefflingJapanese Crane by Linda Oeffling

Like MccGwire, I am fascinated with bird lore and the mythology associated with birds. Greek and Roman myth tells us that the dance of cranes is a dance for the love of joy, and a celebration of life.  The Japanese refer to the crane as the bird of happiness.

These fused pieces are so fun to watch throughout the day.  They change as the light changes, which makes the art piece something new at any given time of day.

bring it on

It’s been damp and drizzly and chilly in the Midwest lately.  I say either fly me to somewhere tropical, or bring on the snow!

Oeffling - stained glass snowflakeLinda Oeffling, Stained Glass Snowflake, iridized krackle

Featured today are some snowflakes coming out of the studio.  Stained glass work, they are copper wired along the outside rim so they won’t pull apart in time.

Linda Oeffling - stained glass snowflakeLinda Oeffling, Stained Glass Snowflake, frost glass with dichroic center

The snowflakes with more open design have a spot of dichroic glass at the center.  Dichroic glass is an interesting material, originating with the aerospace industry.  In a special manufacturing process, metal oxides bond with glass in a vacuum chamber.  The resulting material reflects certain wavelengths of light and allows other to pass through. The result is a glowing, eye-catching glass that brings a sparkle to the project, capturing light in a unique way.